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Posts Tagged ‘Death’

We Are All Leaving

SpiritRiver

 

Blessings Day 322: a simple line in a movie left me pondering this life we live: “We’re all leaving.” Yes, we are from the moment we are born, we are all leaving, we are all dying.  Morbid I know, but stick with me here.

As I get older life becomes ever more precious, I don’t take it for granted certainly the way I did when I was younger and seemingly immortal.

The line in the movie reminded me that – yes, from the moment we are born, all of God’s creatures are leaving. Each day, every breath simultaneously living and silently edging closer to dying.

I’m not afraid to die, I am afraid to live one day without noticing, enjoying, appreciating, thanking, blessing, and cherishing the preciousness of life, and myself in it.

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Hay House is putting on a global online event interviewing all the teachers that we know and love and many, many more.  This is a 10-day free event, and it’s in its second day.  Today begins with Esther Hicks who does then channel Abraham; Marianne Williamson follows her.  You can register for it at Hay House.  These interviews last about 1 to 1.5 hours each.

 

Today I’ve chosen to highlight Anita Moorjani.  She had a near death experience, and has written about it along with the gifts her illness taught her in the book “Dying to Be Me”.

 

Regarding illness: “It’s not your fault.  It’s not my fault I got cancer; it’s not your fault you got cancer.  Believe it or not, it’s a gift, even if it doesn’t feel like a gift right now, it is a gift.

 

Life is a gift and every challenge in life is a gift.  Cancer didn’t nearly kill me, in fact, it saved my life.  I was killing myself before that.  I was suppressing who I was.  I was treating myself like a doormat.  I was making myself small, so others could feel big.  I was forsaking myself.  I was saying no when I meant yes, and yes when I meant no.  I never allowed myself to be the magnificent soul that I had come here to be.”

 

Later she states: “…Be who you are, you are not your illness.  Don’t make the illness the focal point of who you are, and don’t blame yourself for having an illness.

 

For those of us who have been on this journey of self-improvement or self-help, those of us who read a lot of books and go to a lot of seminars…we are the most critical of ourselves, because we feel we have learned so much, read so much … we say: I’ve read all these books, gone to all these seminars, what is it I am doing wrong?  I just want to tell you:

 

Don’t. Be. So. Hard. On. Yourself.

 

It is this self-criticism; it’s this blaming yourself that is the most damaging thing.  We say: what am I doing wrong?  STOP.  Just STOP everything and all you have to do is just say:

 

Where am I not loving myself?
Where am I not allowing myself to feel unconditional love for myself?

 

And that is it.  That’s all.”

 

Later in the event, she talks more about how quick we are to criticize ourselves.  She wants us to re-train ourselves and come up with five compliments you can give yourself every single day and make them different compliments each day.  She suggests you keep a daily journal and “you will start to realize that there’s a lot of good stuff in there, there’s a lot of good that you do, there’s a lot of good things that you are and you need to know that about yourself.”

 

Ok, who’s in on starting this daily journal?!  I am!!

 

 

 

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When your father dies, say the Irish,
you lose your umbrella against bad weather.
May his sun be your light, say the Armenians.

When your father dies, say the Welsh,
you sink a foot deeper into the earth.
May you inherit his light, say the Armenians.

When your father dies, say the Canadians,
you run out of excuses.
May you inherit his sun, say the Armenians.

When your father dies, say the French,
you become your own father.
May you stand up in his light, say the Armenians.

When your father dies, say the Indians,
he comes back as the thunder.
May you inherit his light, say the Armenians.

When your father dies, say the Russians,
he takes your childhood with him.
May you inherit his light, say the Armenians.

When your father dies, say the English,
you join his club you vowed you wouldn’t.
May you inherit his sun, say the Armenians.

When your father dies, say the Armenians,
your sun shifts forever.
And you walk in his light.

~ Diana Der-Hovanessian ~

Thanks to my friend, Amy Callan, for sending me this.

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